25 Agriculture Gods and Goddesses from Various Mythologies

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Long before the rise of modern farming practices and genetically modified crops, ancient cultures across the globe worshipped agriculture gods. People believed that these deities had immense power over the growth and success of crops, and they often revered and celebrated them through grand festivals and rituals.

From Hathor, the ancient Egyptian goddess of fertility and agriculture, to Demeter, the Greek goddess of agriculture, these gods were integral to many societies’ cultural and spiritual fabric.

Join us as we explore the rich and fascinating world of agriculture deities and delve into the intricate mythology and beliefs that have shaped our understanding of the natural world.

1. Demeter (Greek Mythology)

Demeter greek goddess
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Demeter is a goddess of agriculture and fertility in Greek mythology, known for her association with the harvest and the growth of crops. She was one of the most revered deities in ancient Greek religion and was revered as the bringer of the seasons.

According to the myth, Demeter was the daughter of the Titans, Cronus and Rhea. She was married to Zeus and had a daughter, Persephone. Demeter’s grief at Persephone’s abduction by Hades is said to have caused the changing of the seasons.

Ancient Greeks dedicated many temples and festivals dedicated to her. Eleusis was her most famous cult center, where the Eleusinian Mysteries, secret religious rites believed to bring about spiritual and physical renewal, were celebrated.

Ancient Greeks held rituals in honor of Demeter and Persephone and were considered one of the most notable events in ancient Greek religion.

2. Persephone (Greek Mythology)

Persephone Greek Goddess
 Persephone Greek Goddess. See it here.

Persephone is a goddess of agriculture in Greek mythology, known for associating with changing seasons and the cycle of life and death. According to myth, Persephone was the daughter of Demeter, and Zeus, king of the gods. She was abducted by Hades, the god of the underworld, and forced to become his queen.

Persephone’s abduction caused Demeter to become so grief-stricken that she caused the earth to become barren, bringing about a great famine. Zeus eventually intervened and brokered a deal that allowed Persephone to spend part of the year in the underworld with Hades and part of the year on earth with her mother.

Persephone’s story is seen as a metaphor for the changing of the seasons, with her time in the underworld representing the winter months and her return to earth representing the coming of spring.

There were temples dedicated to her worship in ancient Greece, particularly in the city of Eleusis, where the famous Eleusinian Mysteries were held. Today, there are no known temples specifically dedicated to the worship of Persephone. However, her mythology and symbolism continue to inspire contemporary spiritual practices and artistic representations.

3. Ceres (Roman Mythology)

Ceres roman mythology
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Ceres was the Roman goddess of crops and fertility and motherly love. She is the sister of Jupiter, the king of the gods. The Romans worshiped and built many temples and festivals in her honor.

Ceres was also associated with motherly love and was believed to have a strong connection with children. Ceres’ daughter Proserpina, was abducted by the underworld god and taken to live in the underworld with him.

Ceres’ grief at the loss of her daughter is said to have caused the earth to become barren, bringing about a great famine. Jupiter eventually intervened and brokered a deal that allowed Proserpina to spend part of the year on earth with her mother and part of the year in the underworld with her captor.

Ceres’ legacy is a reminder of the importance of agriculture and the power of motherly love. Her association with fertility and growth has made her a symbol of renewal and hope. Her story inspires people worldwide to connect with the natural world and the earth’s cycles.

4. Flora (Roman Mythology)

Flora Roman goddess
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In Roman mythology, Flora is primarily associated with flowers, fertility, and springtime. While she is sometimes depicted as a goddess of agriculture, her sphere of influence is broader than just crops and harvests. Flora was said to have been introduced to Rome by Sabine, an ancient Italian tribe, and her worship became popular during the Republican period.

As a goddess of flowers, Flora was believed to have the power to bring forth new growth and beauty. She was often depicted wearing a crown of flowers and carrying a cornucopia, a symbol of abundance. Her festival, the Floralia, was celebrated from April 28th to May 3rd and involved feasting, dancing, and the wearing of floral wreaths.

While Flora’s connection to agriculture may have been secondary to her other attributes, she was still an important figure in Roman religion and mythology. Her role as a symbol of renewal and fecundity made her a popular subject in art and literature, and her influence can still be seen in contemporary celebrations of springtime and the renewal of the natural world.

5. Hathor (Egyptian Mythology)

Egyptian Goddess Hathor
Egyptian Goddess Hathor. See it here.

Hathor was a goddess of many things in ancient Egyptian mythology, including fertility, beauty, music, and love. While she was not specifically a goddess of agriculture, she was often associated with the land and the natural world.

Hathor was often depicted as a cow or a woman with cow’s horns and was seen as a symbol of motherhood and nourishment. She was closely linked to the Nile River, which was essential for the growth of crops in Egypt. As a goddess of fertility, she was believed to have the power to bring forth new life and abundance.

Hathor’s worship was popular throughout ancient Egypt, and she was often venerated alongside other gods and goddesses in local and regional cults. Her festivals were occasions for feasting, music, and dance, and her cult centers often included temples and shrines dedicated to her worship.

While Hathor’s primary role was not that of an agricultural goddess, her connection to the land and her associations with fertility and abundance made her an important figure in the religious and cultural life of ancient Egypt.

6. Osiris (Egyptian Mythology)

Black statue of Osiris the god
Black statue of Osiris the god. See it here.

Osiris was an ancient Egyptian god associated with agriculture, fertility, and the afterlife. His story is one of the most enduring in Egyptian mythology. Osiris was a god-king of Egypt and was deeply revered by his people. Ancient Egyptians believed that Osiris taught the Egyptians how to cultivate crops and was often depicted as a green-skinned deity, representing his association with agriculture.

Osiris’ story is also linked with the afterlife, as he was murdered by his jealous brother Set and resurrected by his wife, Isis. His resurrection symbolized rebirth and renewal, and many Egyptians believed they would be resurrected after death.

Osiris’ legacy reminds us of the importance of the cycles of nature. His association with the afterlife has also made him a symbol of hope and renewal. His worship involved elaborate rituals, including the reenactment of his death and resurrection, and he was venerated throughout Egypt.

7. Tlaloc (Aztec Mythology)

God Tlaloc
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Tlaloc was an Aztec god of agriculture and rain, believed to have the power to bring fertility to the crops. He was one of the most important gods in the Aztec pantheon and was revered for his ability to bring rain and fertility to the land.

Artists often depicted Tlaloc as a blue-skinned deity, representing his association with water and rain. He was also depicted as a fierce deity with fangs and long claws, wearing a headdress of feathers and a necklace of human skulls.

Tlaloc was the patron god of farmers and was often invoked during drought or when the crops needed rain. He was also associated with thunder and lightning; many believed he was responsible for the devastating storms that could strike the region.

The Aztecs believed that if Tlaloc was not properly appeased with offerings and sacrifices, he could withhold rain and bring drought and famine to the land. The worship of Tlaloc involved elaborate rituals, including the sacrifice of children, which were believed to be the most valuable offerings to the god.

8. Xipe Totec (Aztec Mythology)

Xipe Totec
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Xipe Totec is a deity in Aztec mythology, revered as the god of agriculture, vegetation, fertility, and rebirth. His name means “our lord the flayed one,” referring to the ritual practice of flaying human sacrificial victims to symbolize the renewal of life.

In Aztec belief, Xipe Totec was responsible for the growth of crops. He was often depicted wearing flayed skin, symbolizing the shedding of the old to reveal the new, and he was seen as a god of transformation and renewal.

As a deity of agriculture, Xipe Totec was also associated with the cycles of life and death. He had the power to bring new life to the earth, renew soil fertility, and ensure the survival of crops and livestock through the harsh seasons.

Xipe Totec was also associated with human sacrifice and ceremonial cleansing. His followers believed that participating in his rituals could achieve spiritual purification and renewal.

9. Inti (Inca Mythology)

The sun-god Inti
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Inti was an Incan god of agriculture and the sun, believed to have the power to make the land fertile and bring warmth to the people. According to the myth, Inti was revered as one of the most important gods in the Incan pantheon and was often depicted as a radiant sun disk. His worshipers thought he brought the people warmth and light and ensured a rich harvest.

Inti was also linked to sacrifice, and people would call on him during ceremonies where animals and crops were given to winning his favor. People thought of these sacrifices as a way to give back to god and as a way to make sure he would bless them.

His association with fertility and warmth has made Inti a symbol of hope and renewal. His story continues to inspire people worldwide to connect with the natural world and seek out the mysteries of the earth and the cycles of life and death.

10. Pachamama (Inca Mythology)

Pachamama goddess
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Pachamama was an Incan goddess of agriculture and fertility, believed to have the power to bring prosperity to the land and to the people. She was revered as the mother goddess of the earth, responsible for crops’ growth and the land’s fertility. Artists often portrayed her as a woman with a pregnant belly, representing her association with fertility and abundance.

Pachamama was believed to be the patron goddess of farmers and was often invoked during planting and harvest seasons. She was also associated with the natural world and the earth’s cycles, and many believed she was responsible for the earthquakes and volcanic eruptions that could strike the region.

Pachamama’s legacy continues to be felt today, as her story serves as a reminder of the importance of agriculture and the cycles of the earth. Her worship involves offerings and rituals to honor the earth and the natural world. It continues to be an important part of Andean culture.

11. Dagon (Mesopotamian Mythology)

Dagon Mesopotamian god
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Dagon was a Mesopotamian deity who was primarily associated with agriculture, fertility, and the harvest. He was worshipped by the ancient Sumerians and later by the Babylonians and Assyrians.

As a god of agriculture, Dagon was believed to have the power to ensure a good harvest and to bring prosperity to his worshippers. He was often depicted as a bearded man holding a sheaf of wheat, a symbol of abundance and fertility.

Dagon’s worship involved offerings and sacrifices of animals and grains, as well as the recitation of prayers and hymns. His temple at Ashdod in ancient Israel was one of the largest and most important in the region, and he was venerated throughout Mesopotamia as well.

While Dagon’s influence as a god of agriculture may have declined over time, his legacy can still be seen in the cultural and spiritual traditions of the region. He remains an important figure in Mesopotamian mythology, and his association with the bounty of the earth continues to inspire reverence and devotion.

12. Inanna (Mesopotamian Mythology)

Inanna Mesopotamia
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Inanna, also known as Ishtar, was a Mesopotamian goddess who played a significant role in the mythology and religion of the ancient Sumerians, Akkadians, and Babylonians. While she was not specifically a goddess of agriculture, she was associated with fertility, abundance, and the natural world.

The worship of Inanna involved elaborate rituals and offerings, including the recitation of hymns and prayers, the burning of incense, and the sacrifice of animals. Her temples were some of the largest and most ornate in Mesopotamia, and her cult centers were important centers of learning, culture, and commerce.

Inanna was often depicted as a powerful and beautiful goddess, with long hair and a headdress adorned with horns and stars. She was believed to have the power to bestow fertility and abundance upon the land, as well as the power to protect her followers and bring them prosperity.

Inanna’s role as a goddess of agriculture may have been more indirect than that of other deities, but her association with fertility and abundance made her an important figure in the spiritual and cultural life of Mesopotamia.

13. Ninurta (Babylonian Mythology)

Ninurta Babylonian Mythology
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Ninurta was a complex deity in Babylonian mythology, known for his multifaceted role as a god of agriculture, hunting, and warfare. He was seen as a patron of crops, as well as a fierce warrior and protector of the people.

As a god of agriculture, Ninurta was associated with the plow, the sickle, and the hoe, and was believed to have the power to bring rain and ensure successful harvests. He was also seen as a god of nature and the environment, who could protect the land from natural disasters like floods and storms.

In addition to his agricultural associations, Ninurta was also revered as a god of war, believed to have the power to defeat enemies and protect the Babylonian people. His weapons included a bow, arrows, and a mace, and he was often depicted wearing a horned helmet and carrying a shield.

The Babylonians believed that Ninurta was a powerful deity who had the ability to bring rain and ensure a successful harvest. To appease him and gain his favor, they offered him various agricultural products such as barley, wheat, and dates. They also sacrificed animals such as sheep, goats, and bulls to him, believing that his power would bring them protection and prosperity.

Ninurta’s temples were some of the largest and most impressive in ancient Babylon, with grandiose architecture and ornate decorations. His cult centers were important centers of learning and culture, as well as commerce and trade. People from all walks of life would visit the temples to pay homage to the powerful deity and seek his protection and blessings.

14. Shala (Mesopotamian Mythology)

Shala Mesopotamian God
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In Mesopotamian mythology, Shala is a revered goddess, worshipped as the deity of agriculture and grain. She often appears as a beautiful figure, wearing a green sari and holding a sheaf of grain, believed to protect crops and fields, ensuring a successful harvest.

Shala is associated with the cycles of life and death, renewing the fertility of the soil, bringing new life to the earth, and guaranteeing the survival of crops and livestock through the harsh seasons. She is also linked with fertility and prosperity, capable of bringing happiness and abundance to her worshippers.

Shala’s benevolent and protective nature has made her a beloved figure, and her influence extends beyond agricultural practices to include celebrations of fertility and prosperity.

Her worship involved offerings of grains, fruits, and vegetables, as well as the recitation of hymns and prayers. Shala’s temples were also important centers of learning and commerce, where people could seek her blessings and protection for their crops and livelihoods.

15. Inari (Japanese Mythology)

Inari Japanese god
Inari Japanese goddess. See it here.

In Japanese mythology, Inari is a revered deity known as the god of agriculture, fertility, and foxes. Inari appears as a male or female figure wearing a rice bag hat and carrying a bundle of rice.

Inari ensures a successful harvest and protects crops from pests and disease. Farmers and agricultural communities would invoke this powerful deity to bless their fields and ensure their crops’ survival.

As a deity of agriculture, Inari is associated with fertility and abundance. They possess the power to ensure the growth and survival of crops and the birth of animals and humans.

In addition to their role as a deity of agriculture, Inari is also associated with foxes. Foxes are considered messengers of Inari and are believed to have the power to protect crops and bring good luck to farmers.

16. Oshun (Yoruba Mythology)

Oshun Yoruba goddess
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In Yoruba religion, Oshun is a revered deity, worshipped as the goddess of love, beauty, freshwaters, agriculture, and fertility. According to Yoruba belief, Oshun is responsible for ensuring the fertility of the soil and the survival of crops.

Oshun is depicted as a graceful figure adorned with gold, holding a mirror, fan, or gourd. Her followers believe she can bring prosperity, abundance, and fertility to the land. She is invoked by farmers and agricultural communities to bless their fields and guarantee a successful harvest.

As a goddess of agriculture, Oshun is also associated with the cycles of life and death. She is believed to have the power to bring new life to the earth, renew the soil’s fertility, and ensure the survival of crops and livestock through the harsh seasons.

Oshun is worshipped through various rituals and ceremonies, such as offering sacrifices of fruits, honey, and other sweets, as well as the recitation of hymns and prayers. Her worship is often accompanied by music and dance, with devotees wearing bright yellow and gold clothing to honor her.

In the diaspora, Oshun’s worship has been blended with other traditions, such as Santeria in Cuba and Candomble in Brazil. Her influence can also be seen in various forms of popular culture, such as music and art.

17. Anuket (Nubian Mythology)

Anuket Egyptian goddess
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Anuket is a goddess in Egyptian mythology, revered as the goddess of the Nile River and associated with agriculture and fertility. She is depicted wearing a headdress of ostrich feathers or reeds, holding a wand, and often carrying a jar or ankh, symbols of fertility.

According to Egyptian belief, Anuket was responsible for the flooding of the Nile River, which brought fertile soil and water to the surrounding farmlands, making them suitable for cultivation.

As a goddess of agriculture, Anuket was also associated with the cycles of life and death. She could bring new life to the earth, renew soil fertility, and ensure the survival of crops and livestock through the harsh seasons.

Anuket’s temples were often located near the Nile River and were important centers of commerce and trade. Despite the decline of her worship in modern times, Anuket’s influence can still be seen in various forms of Egyptian art and literature. Her image is often depicted in temples and on ceremonial objects, such as amulets and jewelry.

18. Yum Kaax (Mayan Mythology)

Yum Kaax Mayan God
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Yum Kaax is a deity in Mayan mythology, revered as the god of agriculture, vegetation, and fertility. The name “Yum Kaax” translates to “Lord of the Fields” in the Maya language, and his influence is felt throughout the agricultural cycles of the Maya people.

Yum Kaax is often portrayed as a young man, wearing a headdress made of leaves and holding a cornstalk. As a god of agriculture, Yum Kaax is also associated with the cycles of life and death. He is believed to have the power to bring new life to the earth, renew soil fertility, and ensure the survival of crops and livestock through the harsh seasons.

While traditional Maya religion has largely been replaced by Christianity in modern times, some indigenous Maya communities in Mexico and Central America continue to worship Yum Kaax as a part of their cultural heritage.

Yum Kaax’s worship involves various rituals and ceremonies, such as the offering of fruits, vegetables, and other agricultural products. Aside from agricultural and medicinal practices, Yum Kaax’s worship also involves hunting and fishing rituals, as he is believed to protect animals and ensure a bountiful catch.

19. Chaac (Mayan Mythology)

Mayan God Chaac
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In Mayan mythology, Chaac was a very important god linked to farming and fertility. As the god of rain, Chaac was thought to give crops the water they needed to grow and ensure a good harvest.

Mayans believed that Chaac brought rain, which was important for growing crops. People considered him a kind, generous god who always sought what was best for his people. Because of this, farmers and agricultural communities often called on him to ensure they had a good harvest and keep their crops safe from droughts or floods.

Chaac was a god of farming but was also connected to the natural world and the environment. People thought of him as a protector of the forests and animals. Some depictions of Chaac portray him with features that show his status as a protector of animals, like sporting jaguar fangs or a snake tongue.

While the specifics of Chaac’s worship may vary between different communities, he remains an important figure in Maya culture and continues to be celebrated and honored by some people today.

20. Ninsar (Akkadian Mythology)

In ancient Sumerian mythology, Ninsar was a goddess also connected to farming and having children. People thought she was the daughter of Enki, the god of water and wisdom, and Ninhursag, goddess of earth and motherhood.

Sumerians thought Ninsar was responsible for ensuring crops grew and the land was fertile. She was often shown as a caring person who cared for plants and animals, and her role was very important to the success of farming in Sumerian society.

Ninsar was a goddess of farming, and the cycle of life and death was also linked to her. People thought she was in charge of the renewal of the earth and the rebirth of life since new plants grew from the seeds of old ones.

Ninsar was also linked to the creation of people in some Sumerian myths. It was said that she had given birth to seven young plants, which the god Enki then fertilized to make the first people.

21. Jarilo (Slavic Mythology)

Jarilo Slavic god of agriculture
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Jarilo, the Slavic god of agriculture and spring, was a popular deity in the pagan beliefs of the Slavic people from the 6th to the 9th century CE. The Slavic people believed that Jarilo was the son of the supreme god of Slavic mythology, Perun, and the earth goddess and fertility goddess, Lada.

As a god of agriculture, Jarilo was responsible for crops’ growth and the land’s fertility. He was also a god of rebirth and renewal, as his return in the spring brought new life to the earth.

In addition to agriculture, Jarilo was also associated with war and fertility. He was believed to have the power to protect warriors in battle and ensure the success of their campaigns. He was also associated with fertility and was believed to possess the power to ensure the health and well-being of mothers and their children.

According to Slavic mythology, Jarilo was born during the winter solstice and grew to adulthood within a single day. His twin brother, Morana, who represented the god of death and winter, killed him. However, Jarilo was reborn each spring, marking the beginning of a new agricultural cycle.

Jarilo was often depicted as a young, handsome god, wearing a wreath of flowers on his head, and carrying a sword and a horn of plenty. Music, dance, and fertility rites were associated with him, which were performed to ensure a bountiful harvest.

While the worship of Jarilo declined with the spread of Christianity throughout Eastern Europe, his legacy continues to be celebrated and studied by scholars and enthusiasts of Slavic mythology and culture.

22. Enzili Dantor (Haitian Vodou)

Enzili Dantor
Enzili Dantor. See it here.

Enzili Dantor is a goddess in Haitian Vodou who is associated with both agriculture and the African spirit of the warrior. Her name translates to “the priestess who is the incarnation of the spirit of the mother goddess.” She is considered to be one of the most powerful spirits in the Haitian Vodou pantheon and is often portrayed as a fierce warrior who protects her devotees.

Enzili Dantor is associated with the spirit of the ocean and is often depicted holding a dagger, which represents her role as a protector of her followers. She is also associated with the colors red and blue and is often represented wearing a red scarf.

The worship of Enzili Dantor involves offerings of food, rum, and other gifts to the goddess, as well as drumming, dancing, and other forms of celebration. She is considered to be a compassionate goddess who is willing to help her followers in times of need.

Enzili Dantor is a complex deity who is revered for her many different qualities and attributes. She represents the power of the feminine and is seen as a symbol of strength, courage, and resilience in the face of adversity. Her legacy continues to be celebrated and studied by those who practice Haitian Vodou around the world.

23. Freyr

Freyr
Freyr. See it here.

Freyr was a Norse god of agriculture, prosperity, and fertility. The ancient Norse people believed that he protected the land and its people. Freyr was connected to the natural world and how seasons came and went.

Norse myths say Freyr could control the weather and ensure a good harvest. He was handsome and kind, with a gentle personality and a love for peace. As a god of farming, Freyr was responsible for fertility and making a new life. He could bless the earth with new growth and ensure crops and animals would live through the harsh winter months.

The worship of Freyr involved offerings of food, drink, and other gifts, as well as the building of shrines and temples in his honor. He was often depicted with a phallic symbol, which represented his association with fertility and virility.

Despite the decline of the Norse religion, the legacy of Freyr continues to be celebrated by modern-day Heathens and followers of Asatru. He remains a symbol of abundance and prosperity, and his worship continues to inspire those who seek to honor the natural world and the cycles of the seasons.

24. Kokopelli (Native American Mythology)

Kokopelli
Kokopelli Figure. See it here.

Kokopelli is a fertility deity of Native American mythology, specifically among the Hopi, Zuni, and Pueblo tribes of the Southwest United States. He is depicted as a hunchbacked flute player, often with exaggerated sexual features, and is associated with fertility, agriculture, and childbirth.

Kokopelli is said to have the ability to bring fertility to the land and to bless crops with a bountiful harvest. His music is believed to be a powerful force that can awaken the spirits of the land and inspire new growth.

In addition to his role in agriculture, Kokopelli is also associated with storytelling, humor, and trickery. He is often depicted with a mischievous grin and a playful demeanor, and his stories and music are said to have the power to heal and transform.

Kokopelli’s worship involves offerings of food, drink, and gifts, as well as the building of shrines and the playing of music in his honor. His image is often used in art and jewelry, and his flute playing is a popular motif in Native American music.

25. Äkräs (Finnish Mythology)

Äkräs God of fertility
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In Finnish mythology, Äkräs embodies a deity of agriculture and the natural world. He appears as a bearded man with a large belly and a pleasant demeanor, embodying a benevolent figure that brings fertility and abundance to the land.

Äkräs ensures a successful harvest and protects crops from disease and pests. Farmers and agricultural communities invoke him to bless their fields and ensure their crops’ survival.

As a deity of agriculture, Äkräs is associated with the cycle of life and death. He can renew soil fertility and bring new life to the earth. His influence extends to ensure crops and livestock survival through the harsh winter months.

Wrapping Up

Human history and mythology reflect the significant role of the gods and goddesses of agriculture. From the ancient Greeks to the Mayans and Sumerians, people worshipped and revered these deities for their power.

Their stories have inspired people throughout history to connect with the natural world and appreciate the earth’s cycles. These gods symbolized hope and renewal, reminding us of the importance of agriculture and the power of nature.

Today, people worldwide continue to feel their legacy, seeking ways to connect with the land and protect it for future generations.

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Nemanja

Nemanja

I am a writer and a teacher of rhetoric, international humanitarian law, and entrepreneurship. As a writer, I specialize in writing about history, politics, and finding quirky ways to elevate all the great selling points of a product/service. I obtained my bachelor's degree in International Relations at the University of Montenegro and completed my master' s studies at the Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary where I studied diplomacy. I believe studying diplomacy and politics sets you up for knowing how to craft a sentence, how to fill it with content and ensure that your audience understands the message.

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